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This Mayor Is Giving $5 To LGBT Rights For Every Anti-Gay Call She Gets. And She’s Getting A LOT.

outrising:

Kim Driscoll, mayor of Salem, Massachusetts, began receiving homophobic abuse over the telephone after cancelling a contract with a local college over their anti-gay position. Their president had supported a small group of homophobes requesting that a ‘religious exemption’ clause be included in an order designed to protect LGBT employees from discrimination. 

image

Once the story had broken online, Driscoll’s phone became red hot with irate bigots.

And that’s when she decided to do something awesome.

For every call the Mayor received refuting her actions, she pledged to donate $5 to a local support group for LGBT young people. Of her own money… Read more.

(via dutchster)

54 notes

webofgoodnews:

The mirror man, a man who travels through Cambodia helping amputees with phantom limb pain through mirror therapy
One of the few Khmer words Stephen Sumner knows is chhue. It means ‘pain’, and it’s something Cambodian people know a lot about from their three-decade-long civil war. Stephen, 53, is a brawny Canadian with an ebullient, even boisterous, manner. This is his third time here in as many years. He rides around on a longtail bicycle with a stack of lightweight mirrors behind the saddle, going to villages, hospitals and physical rehabilitation centres looking for people who have lost their limbs.
In front of Stephen on an upturned pail sits Ven Phath, a soft-spoken, middle-aged father of five. His left trouser leg is rolled up to reveal a stump below the knee, the result of stepping on a mine in 1983. A plasticky prosthetic leg lies beside him.
Ven Phath still experiences pain in his missing foot, and Stephen is showing him how to position a mirror against the inside of his left leg, so the reflection of the right makes it look like both are still intact. “Look. Move. Imagine,” Stephen instructs through an interpreter.
After a couple of minutes of watching his virtual left foot moving, as if revving an imaginary accelerator, Ven Phath smiles and looks up. He says he feels better already. “Tell him,” Stephen says to the interpreter, “if you do this twice a day, ten minutes per session, for five weeks, then chhub chhue.” Pain stop.
Read more
Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews:

The mirror man, a man who travels through Cambodia helping amputees with phantom limb pain through mirror therapy

One of the few Khmer words Stephen Sumner knows is chhue. It means ‘pain’, and it’s something Cambodian people know a lot about from their three-decade-long civil war. Stephen, 53, is a brawny Canadian with an ebullient, even boisterous, manner. This is his third time here in as many years. He rides around on a longtail bicycle with a stack of lightweight mirrors behind the saddle, going to villages, hospitals and physical rehabilitation centres looking for people who have lost their limbs.

In front of Stephen on an upturned pail sits Ven Phath, a soft-spoken, middle-aged father of five. His left trouser leg is rolled up to reveal a stump below the knee, the result of stepping on a mine in 1983. A plasticky prosthetic leg lies beside him.

Ven Phath still experiences pain in his missing foot, and Stephen is showing him how to position a mirror against the inside of his left leg, so the reflection of the right makes it look like both are still intact. “Look. Move. Imagine,” Stephen instructs through an interpreter.

After a couple of minutes of watching his virtual left foot moving, as if revving an imaginary accelerator, Ven Phath smiles and looks up. He says he feels better already. “Tell him,” Stephen says to the interpreter, “if you do this twice a day, ten minutes per session, for five weeks, then chhub chhue.” Pain stop.

Read more

Webofgoodnews.com

26,224 notes

nubbsgalore:

photos by gerry ellis from the david sheldrick wildlife trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in kenya’s tsavo east national park. here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. the elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.

when elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. but as dame daphne sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. with an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years.

cbc’s the nature of things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. you can foster an elephant with the david sheldrick wildlife trust online here. for more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the david sheldrick wildlife trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts

62 notes

webofgoodnews:

Train conductor stops train to visit with autistic boy
A boy with autism who refers to himself as “train conductor Matthew” got the treat of his life when a real conductor stopped his Union Pacific train to visit with him. 
Matthew Mancil, a 12-year-old who has autism and an intellectual disability, has always been obsessed with trains. The summer camp he has been attending at Meadows Park is located next to a set of train tracks, so everyday he would wave to the conductors and flap his arms to get them to sound their horn. 
On Thursday instead of passing by, a train came to stop next to the park and a conductor got out to visit with Matthew. His father said the train conductor must have noticed Matthew by the tracks day after day.
Read more and see video
Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews:

Train conductor stops train to visit with autistic boy

A boy with autism who refers to himself as “train conductor Matthew” got the treat of his life when a real conductor stopped his Union Pacific train to visit with him.

Matthew Mancil, a 12-year-old who has autism and an intellectual disability, has always been obsessed with trains. The summer camp he has been attending at Meadows Park is located next to a set of train tracks, so everyday he would wave to the conductors and flap his arms to get them to sound their horn.

On Thursday instead of passing by, a train came to stop next to the park and a conductor got out to visit with Matthew. His father said the train conductor must have noticed Matthew by the tracks day after day.

Read more and see video

Webofgoodnews.com

144,147 notes

sara-meow:

blusunday:

huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP

The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.

Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.

Genius

Just gonna go cry now mkay

(via avengersassemble-inmypants)

106 notes

webofgoodnews:

Canadians fight to keep water on for 79,000 in Detroit
Thousands of Detroit residents are facing a reality rarely seen around the Great Lakes: Life without water.
But a Canadian group is leading the charge against a controversial plan to stop water service on delinquent accounts.
Maude Barlow, chair of the Council of Canadians, flagged Detroit’s plan to deal with delinquent accounts to the United Nations earlier this year. The UN calls the plan to shut off water a clear violation of human rights.
Barlow will be part of a convoy bringing what she called “good Canadian, public, clean water” across the river to Detroit on July 24.
Read more

webofgoodnews:

Canadians fight to keep water on for 79,000 in Detroit

Thousands of Detroit residents are facing a reality rarely seen around the Great Lakes: Life without water.

But a Canadian group is leading the charge against a controversial plan to stop water service on delinquent accounts.

Maude Barlow, chair of the Council of Canadians, flagged Detroit’s plan to deal with delinquent accounts to the United Nations earlier this year. The UN calls the plan to shut off water a clear violation of human rights.

Barlow will be part of a convoy bringing what she called “good Canadian, public, clean water” across the river to Detroit on July 24.

Read more